Java Interface

Another way to achieve abstraction in Java is with interfaces.

An interface is a completely "abstract class" that is used to group related methods with empty bodies:

Example

// interface
interface Animal {
  public void animalSound(); // interface method (does not have a body)
  public void run(); // interface method (does not have a body)
}

To access the interface methods, the interface must be "implemented" (kinda like inherited) by another class with the implements keyword (instead of extends). The body of the interface method is provided by the "implement" class:

// Interface
interface Animal {
  public void animalSound(); // interface method (does not have a body)
  public void sleep(); // interface method (does not have a body)
}

// Pig "implements" the Animal interface
class Pig implements Animal {
  public void animalSound() {
    // The body of animalSound() is provided here
    System.out.println("The pig says: wee wee");
  }
  public void sleep() {
    // The body of sleep() is provided here
    System.out.println("Zzz");
  }
}

class MyMainClass {
  public static void main(String[] args) {
    Pig myPig = new Pig();  // Create a Pig object
    myPig.animalSound();
    myPig.sleep();
  }
}

Multiple Interfaces

To implement multiple interfaces, separate them with a comma:

interface FirstInterface {
  public void myMethod(); // interface method
}

interface SecondInterface {
  public void myOtherMethod(); // interface method
}

// DemoClass "implements" FirstInterface and SecondInterface
class DemoClass implements FirstInterface, SecondInterface {
  public void myMethod() {
    System.out.println("Some text..");
  }
  public void myOtherMethod() {
    System.out.println("Some other text...");
  }
}

class MyMainClass {
  public static void main(String[] args) {
    DemoClass myObj = new DemoClass();
    myObj.myMethod();
    myObj.myOtherMethod();
  }
}